A 20-Year-Old Ugandan Fashion And Lifestyle Blogger

Meet Lamic Kirabo, also known as Third Local, a 20-year-old Ugandan fashion and lifestyle blogger who is poised to take on the East African fashion scene by storm. She’ll also be taking over the TRUE Africa Instagram handle on Sunday April 23 and take us behind the scenes of a fashion shoot with all the freshest faces, stylists, makeup artists and creatives in Uganda.

Her blog features Lamic rocking the latest and greatest in Ugandan fashion—from Gloria Wavumunno, Kona to Sylvia Owori. With a clean and timeless aesthetic, Lamic uses the blogging platform (and her poppin’ Instagram) to showcase her favorite designers and beauty brands from Uganda such as the Good Hair Collective’s Kentaro natural hair products.

With her co-collaborator Lara Owor, she has also branched out into lifestyle pieces showcasing what a ‘millennial African woman’ looks like in Uganda.

 

Currently pursuing a degree in fashion and retail marketing, Lamic also freelances as a photographer and model. Recently featured in British-Ugandan poet George The Poet’s video for his latest release Wake Up which was shot entirely in Uganda, Third Local is definitely one to watch out for in 2017.

I recently caught up with Lamic to find out more about her inspirations, aspirations, and style tips.

How did you come up with the name ‘Third Local?’

Third Local comes from me wanting to create a positive affiliation to the word ‘local’ in my country and the continent.

I wanted to create content that was relatable to this new wave of millennial African women.

Local brands and creatives from Africa are often seen as substandard, unprofessional, not just by outsiders but even us as Africans, I want to be part of the change in that.

How did you get into blogging?

I wanted to create content that was relatable to this new wave of millennial African women. I wanted to promote local brands, and make international brands relatable to the local audience.

I felt that kind of content was missing, and we still have a long way to go, but I hope I can impact the creation of that in some way however small.

Who are your biggest inspirations?

My dad, and so many artists and creatives—too many mention. My dad was an artist and an architect and I grew up surrounded by art; he collected art and interior pieces in a showroom adjoined to my childhood home.

I don’t think we have to compromise our aesthetic as Africans to embrace international brands.

So for as long as I can remember I was in an environment where art was celebrated and artistic expression encouraged, I guess that’s why art will always be a part of me. But really I’m inspired by people who manage to portray certain places and people honestly but still in an incredibly beautiful way.

In the fashion world, Margaret Zhang, she has managed to position herself as a fashion documenter; Olivier Rousteing, the creative director of Balmain; Siya Beyile, he runs The Threaded Man. The list is so long, but [essentially] young people who have become experts in the field of fashion and artistic expression.

Buying African no longer means buying a kitenge dress for a Ugandan traditional marriage.

Where do you see the blog going in the future? What are your plans to expand your brand?

I want to grow my blog to be a portal that connects African brands with a wide audience, to create a strong interest in African brands. I also want to be able to bring international brands here, make them relatable to this audience.

I don’t think we have to compromise our aesthetic as Africans to embrace international brands.

 

What are your thoughts on the fashion scene in Uganda or East Africa in general? How do you think it’s developed in the past few years?

I think it has grown immensely, I think there is a greater desire for excellence among designers and buyers. Buying African no longer means buying a kitenge dress for a Ugandan traditional marriage.

The goal is for Ugandan [and] East African designers to be regarded on the same playing field as international designers, but that will take time for both the designer and the buyer. But the industry is still so young and it’s amazing how much has been accomplished. From fashion weeks, to publications and events, it’s growing exponentially.

Does Ugandan culture influence your style, if so, in what ways?

It definitely does. I’m really trying to find ways to embrace that culture and make it relatable to my lifestyle without compromising the authenticity of my Ugandan culture. I think that’s something we as young Africans struggle with.

Favourite style piece at the moment?

Gloria Wavamunno’s oversized chokers, they make even the simplest outfits look super edgy.

Leave a Reply